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Joined: Apr 2008
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Senior Member (100+ posts)

Joined: Apr 2008
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One more thing. Shortly after the crown was put on and I started feeling pain in the area around the root of that tooth.. It persisted. And it was scary, because having an infection there is very risky

My periodontist told me to swab the area with Peridex (Chlorhexidine Gluconate). I did that for a few weeks and it worked. But after I stopped the pain came back. So I started swabbing again, but for many weeks. When I stopped the pain never came back, I wish I could tell you how many weeks, but I didn't keep track. .


Squamous cell carcinoma base of tongue. Lymph involvement unclear; staging placed at "2 or 3." Biopsy 4/18/2008. Treatment: IMRT every day for 7 weeks. Cisplaten once a week to sensitize cancer to radiation. Treatment ended 7/16/08. PET/CT shows no more cancer.
Joined: Mar 2002
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Patient Advocate (old timer, 2000 posts)

Joined: Mar 2002
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It is not uncommon for the gingiva around a new crown to be sore for a period of time. The soft tissue can be damaged during the tooth preparation by the burr in the handpiece, and the tissue is packed with a thick cord to push and hold it away from the tooth, so that the margin where the crown and tooth ultimately meet is fully exposed for the impression making. The lab tech will need to see that margin in detail on the model of it made from the impression to fabricate a crown that will fit perfectly and intimately to the prepared tooth. It can take a week or more for that periodontal gingiva to tighten up around the neck of the tooth again. Even when the new crown is seated, the process of cementing it in place, then scraping any extra dried cement from that soft tissue sulcus around the tooth can irritate it again.

Keeping it clean is important even though brushing it can be irritating, and further prolong the discomfort. The Peridex is a useful tool to keeping bacteria at bay in this area till the healing is completed. Sounds like it all resolved.


Brian, stage 4 oral cancer survivor. OCF Founder and Director. The first responsibility of a leader is to define reality. The last is to say thank you. In between, the leader is a servant.
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