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#201183 01-25-2022 03:22 PM
Joined: Aug 2021
Posts: 2
MrFox Offline OP
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Joined: Aug 2021
Posts: 2
Dear all,

I am post-surgery by 16 months after having 40% of my tongue removed and replaced by a free flap from my forearm, with microvascular surgery.
Up until two weeks ago, the flap has remained very pink, almost a similar colour to the remainder of my tongue. However over the last two weeks, it has now turned white, and not as though it is about to shed, which it does appear to do regularly. This does appear different, thicker and rubbery and very white, almost as white as paint. Is this something that I should be concerned about? Or does this happen over time and has this happened to others?

Many thanks, much appreciated

Joined: Mar 2002
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Joined: Mar 2002
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I have seen and heard of patients that have these kinds of tissue transfer flaps have the tissue change color a couple times early in the process. This is a function of the new vascularization of the tissue. They seem to start out pink, turn grayish and return to pink as the new micro vascularization occurs and reflects the changing tissue as the blood supply changes.They also seem large at the beginning and ultimately get somewhat smaller as they heal in. I have not talked to anyone that has had this happen far into the process and I think you need to see your doctors soon for their take. Causes for this might be an infection that has taken hold, either bacterial or fungal.

I hope someone joins in with some direct experience. I wish I had a better answer for you. Please come back after seeing your doctor and let us know what this was and what the solution to it is they are going to apply. It will help us understand it better, to in the future help others. I hope you find this is something simple and easy to deal with. Wishing you the best. B


Brian, stage 4 oral cancer survivor. OCF Founder and Director. The first responsibility of a leader is to define reality. The last is to say thank you. In between, the leader is a servant.

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